Residency

Length of surgery unchanged by "July Effect"

Residency Program Insider, January 30, 2015

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Researchers found that the average surgical times in July, when newly trained physicians begin their residencies, had no significant difference from those of other months.
 
The researchers from Stanford University and the University of Vermont analyzed surgical time data over a five year period to see if teaching a new physician compared to using an experienced physician anesthesiologist or surgeon resulted in longer surgery times. Neither the average total monthly operating minutes nor the average daily operating minutes in July differed significantly.
 
The study’s author believes no difference was found because hospitals have policies in place to ease new residents into the training environment, which limits the effect they have on surgeries.
 
Source: American Society of Anesthesiologists

 



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