Nursing

Policies and programs do not eliminate medical student mistreatment

Nurse Leader Insider, August 10, 2012

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Mistreatment of medical students by senior physicians and residents persists despite policies and procedures intended to prevent it, according to authors of a study at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. Over a 13-year period, medical students at the school completed anonymous surveys following their third year, and reported instances of verbal or physical abuse, sexual harassment, ethnic mistreatment, and power mistreatment. Of the nearly 2,000 students who completed the survey, approximately 60% experienced some form of mistreatment, and 5% reported physical mistreatment.

Researchers note that the school has taken a proactive approach to eliminating medical student mistreatment by creating a Gender and Power Abuse Committee, made up of administrators, faculty, and mental health professionals, and by establishing policies intended to prevent mistreatment, mechanisms for reporting it, resources for safe and informal discussion and resolution, and education for faculty, residents, students, and nurses. Despite this, researchers concluded that mistreatment of medical students persists and an aggressive approach, both locally and nationally, is required to eliminate mistreatment.

View the study in Academic Medicine.

Source: The New York Times

 



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