Long-Term Care

Stepping up to the culture change challenge

PPS Alert for Long-Term Care, July 1, 2010

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In early 2009, Hebrew Rehabilitation Center in Boston transferred approximately 220 residents to its new, state-of-the-art campus in Dedham, MA. This marked a major milestone in the organization’s culture change efforts—one that would prove beneficial to more than just the residents at the new campus.

The new campus, which is known as New Bridge, was designed around household models: 14–16 residents live in one household, and three households that are connected are considered a neighborhood. The physical structure of New Bridge supports culture change, a resident-centered model of care, and a better quality of life for residents. 

But what about the residents who remain in the original facility in Boston?

“When I started working at Hebrew Rehab and heard about the culture change efforts at the new building, I asked if we were going to do culture change in the old building. The response was no because of the limitations of the old building,” says Lisa Cappuccilli, RN, MA, LNC, vice president of nursing and patient- and family-centered care services at Hebrew Rehabilitation Center. “I told them that it is not about the building, it is about the people inside the building.” 

 

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to PPS Alert for Long-Term Care.

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