Residency

Residency Headlines

  • The latest tips for program coordinators

    Now available! The newest edition of The Residency Program Coordinator’s Handbook, by Ruth Nawotniak, MS, C-TAGME, is your guidebook.

  • Tip of the week: Keep an eye on moonlighting with malpractice insurance

    Any residency program that allows moonlighting during training must have a written policy addressing it. The Institutional Requirements state that residents cannot be forced to moonlight, and the program’s contract must reflect this. The program director must approve any moonlighting because it could impact a resident’s duty hours. The program director and faculty also have to closely monitor the resident’s performance and look for any signs that the resident is feeling fatigued.

  • Help your faculty teach QI

    If your faculty needs training to teach patient safety and quality improvement, check out this free webinar about a new faculty development program.

     

  • Heard this week

    “Although I hope my residents will keep pace with a rapidly changing healthcare system, I want them first and foremost to be superb clinicians, and the Milestones seem to prioritize systems-based aspects of care at the expense of raw medical knowledge and diagnostic ability.”
     
    Michael D. Stillman, MD, describes why he’s unconvinced the Next Accreditation System will prepare trainees to practice medicine in the 21st century in a recent issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

  • Out of the House

    A bill to support GME training in children’s hospitals is headed to President Obama’s desk.

    The Children’s Hospital GME Support Reauthorization Act of 2013, sponsored by U.S. Senators Bob Casey (D-PA) and Johnny Isakson (R-GA), provides $300 million annually for the next five years for GME training in freestanding children’s hospitals.
     
    The program, which has been reauthorized several times since it was introduced in 1999, provides children’s hospitals with GME fuunding similar to what other teaching hospitals receive, according to a press release issued by the senators’ offices. The number of residency slots in children's hospitals has increased 45% since since the program was enacted, according to the release.
     
    The bill passed the U.S. House of Representatives on April 1 and will move to the President’s desk to be signed into law.
     

  • Excel in your role as program coordinator

    Now available! The newest edition of The Residency Program Coordinator’s Handbook, by Ruth Nawotniak, MS, C-TAGME, is your guidebook.