Residency

Coordinators’ salaries by experience

Residency Program Insider, February 10, 2021

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Editor’s note: The following is an edited excerpt from Residency Program Alert’s (RPA) coverage of the 2020 Residency Coordinator Salary Survey, which can be accessed in the RPA archive here.

Coordinators are often thought of as the one constant in residency programs. When compared to the traditionally high turnover rates among department chairs and program directors, coordinators tend to be a source of consistency over the years.

Responses to the 2020 Residency Coordinator Salary Survey support this to a point. As expected, many respondents have worked in GME for decades (see Figure 1). However, the percentage of respondents who are relatively new to the field—those with five or fewer years’ experience working in GME—has increased by 2% from 2019's survey results to 39%. Also, unlike past years' surveys, no respondents reported working in GME for more than 35 years.

While survey responses to the 2020 survey still show a large crop of coordinators in newer roles, the data suggests that coordinators are staying in their current positions longer. Thirteen percent of respondents reported being in their position for less than a year (Figure 2), a 1% decrease from 2019. Meanwhile, those who reported being in their current position for 1–2 years and 6–10 years increased by 2% and 3% respectively. The percentage of coordinators who have been in their position for 25 or more years also saw no change from 2019.  

Survey data does suggest that those who stay longer earn higher salaries. For example, the majority (84%) of respondents with 1–5 years of experience in the industry reported making less than $55,000 per year. In fact, no respondents with 1–5 years of experience reported earning more than $60,000. In comparison, just 29% of respondents with more than 20 years of experience reported earning less than $55,000 (Figure 3). However, years in the industry alone may not be the best indicator of earnings, as other relevant factors should be considered.



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