Residency

Report: More nutrition education needed in medical training

Residency Program Insider, October 14, 2019

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On average, less than 1% of medical students’ lecture hours are spent on nutrition education. A new report from the Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic (FLPC) provides recommendations to address this gap in GME.

Among the FLPC report’s recommendations is amending the ACGME accreditation requirements to include nutrition education. It suggests that either the Common Program Requirements or the specialty/subspecialty requirements be amended. The reports notes that if a requirement is added, it may not result in a measurable or significant change to training may not occur due to the relatively broad language the ACGME uses in its requirements.

The FLPC also recommends leveraging government funds to motivate GME programs to include nutrition education. For example, Medicare and Medicaid funding to GME programs could be contingent on requiring nutrition education. The government could also offer performance-based awards to programs that offer nutrition education or administer grants for its inclusion into existing curricula. 

Source: Harvard Law School Food Law and Policy Clinic
 



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