Residency

Gender and anxiety in medical school linked to higher levels of burnout in residents

Residency Program Insider, October 5, 2018

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According to recent research published in JAMA, 45% of second-year residents have experienced symptoms of burnout. While the study identified a relationship between specialty and risk of burnout, it also found two other related factors: gender and anxiety during medical school.

Female physicians were more likely to experience symptoms of burnout, which the study suggests may be a result of sexism, discrimination, and difficulty with a work-home balance. While about 42% of male residents reported symptoms of burnout, nearly 49% of women reported similar experiences. This is in line with findings that suggest female physicians post-residency are more likely to experience burnout than their male counterparts.

Additionally, high levels of anxiety during the last year of medical school also appear to be related to burnout during residency. Medical students with higher levels of anxiety were at an 8% grater risk of experiencing burnout in comparison to their less anxious peers. Furthermore, those with higher levels of empathy during this last year of medical school were found to have lower levels of burnout during residency.

Source: AMA Wire



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