Residency

Ask the expert: How can we convince our governing board to fund an additional resident?

Residency Program Insider, September 27, 2011

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You will want your analysis to prove that adding a resident is budget-neutral—that is, it will result in no increase or decrease in the budget. By adding the resident, the attending physician should be able to see more patients. The increase in revenue from the attending’s billings should be enough to cover the salary, benefits, and overhead costs associated with training the resident.

For example, let’s say you want to add one more resident to a family medicine residency program; your analysis should look something like this. On the inpatient side of things, assume there is a ratio of four residents to one attending, and a ratio of one resident to five patients. Therefore, one attending can see roughly 20 patients. If we add one more resident, we can technically bump up the number of patients that the attending can see, and that will lead to the generation of more bills, which leads to increased revenue. This increased revenue will make up for the additional cost of the extra resident.

This week’s question and answer are from The Graduate Medical Education Committee Handbook by Vicki Hamm and Christine Redovan, MBA.



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