Residency

Duty hour reform associated with more complications after hip surgery

Residency Program Insider, September 8, 2009

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The effect of resident work hour limits on patient care is a big question on the minds of many graduate medical educators as the ACGME considers duty hour reform. A new study says that since duty hour standards were introduced in 2003, the rate of negative outcomes in patients treated for hip fractures in teaching institutions has increased compared to nonteaching hospitals.

Researchers of the study, which appeared in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, looked at patient cases in 2001–2002, before duty hour rules went into effect, and in the years following the implementation, 2004–2005.

Researchers found significantly more cases that resulted in perioperative pneumonia, hematoma, transfusion, renal complications, nonroutine discharge, costs, and length of stay in patients who underwent treatment for a hip fracture at teaching hospitals after duty hour rules were implemented. Researchers did not find an increase in death rates.



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