Nursing

Critical care nurses most likely to face burnout

Nurse Leader Insider, August 4, 2016

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The Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) issued a report stating critical care nurses have some of the highest rates of burnout symptoms, and offers advice for hospitals looking to combat the issue.

The CCSC, a collaborative of professional and scientific groups that includes the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), found that almost half of critical care workers exhibit symptoms of burnout syndrome. 25 to 33% of critical-care nurses manifest signs of severe burnout syndrome, and 86% of nurses have at least one of the symptoms of burnout, such as mental or physical exhaustion. Burnout syndrome can cause a litany of negative health outcomes, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), alcohol or drug abuse, and thoughts of suicide. Additionally, research suggests that burnout increases the number of medical errors and higher patient mortality rates.

The CCSC calls for a collaborative effort to help combat this issue, starting with a commitment to researching burnout syndrome and finding new ways to combat it. Studies have shown that training in mindfulness and problem-focused coping could have beneficial effects for critical-care nurses struggling with burnout, and the CCSC plans to continue exploring ways to tackle the issue.
For more information about the CCSC report, click here.
 



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