Nursing

Incident reports: What you need to know (part two)

Nurse Leader Insider, September 10, 2015

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Incidents reports are a pain to fill out, but vital for documenting what happened and for protecting yourself and your staff. This week, we're republishing installments of a popular post chock full of best practices, provided by Patricia A. Duclos-Miller, MS, RN, CNA, BC.

Last week we looked at the purpose of the incident report and the value of documenting facts as well as the patient's responses to care in the nursing progress notes (see Incident Reports: Part One). Today we'll look at eight risk reduction recommendations you should follow to limit the number of incidents you face. You can also take a look at a check list of tips for writing incident reports should adverse events occur.

Risk reduction recommendations for nurse managers

1. Be sure that everyone is clear as to who is managing the patient. This is especially critical in complicated cases with numerous consults. One of the major factors in adverse events is fragmentation or lack of clear communication between providers. Therefore, use the medical record as a communication tool for all providers and encourage your staff to read notes from other providers and disciplines.

2. Be sure staff understand and utilize the chain of command when necessary. They are considered patient advocates and must speak on behalf of the patient to ensure quality patient care. Documentation of the chain of command process should be factual and blameless.

Read the rest of the steps at our blog for nurse leaders here.



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