Nursing

Web site spotlight: Hospitals shouldn't get stingy with disinfectants, says study

Nurse Leader Insider, April 5, 2010

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Over the past several years, MDROs have become a leading concern for medical facilities attempting to reduce their hospital's healthcare-associated infection (HAI) rate.

A study published in the January Microbiology found that certain organisms can actually become less susceptible to both disinfectants and antibiotics. Researchers grew the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of a common disinfectant—benzalkonium chloride—and found that the bacteria eventually became 12 times less susceptible to the disinfectant and, perhaps more importantly, 256 times more resistant to the drug ciprofloxacin.

Previous studies of antimicrobial resistance haven't translated easily to real world situations, says Gerard T.A. Fleming, researcher for the Department of Microbiology at the School of Natural Sciences at the National University of Ireland in Galway and lead researcher for the study. This study used a system called chemostat, or continuous culture, which allows culture parameters to remain constant, similar to the way organisms grow in their natural environment.

Editor’s note: To read the rest of this article, visit “Hospitals shouldn't get stingy with disinfectants, says study found in the Reading Room at www.StrategiesForNurseManagers.com.

 

Do you need continuing education (CE) credits? Check out this month’s CE article to learn how to help bridge the gap between generations by using creative education or visit our archives and view a compilation of CE articles (marked with an asterisk).



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