Nursing

News spotlight: Nurses address issue of violence in the workplace

Nurse Leader Insider, March 8, 2010

Want to receive articles like this one in your inbox? Subscribe to Nurse Leader Insider!

For years, workplace violence has affected many nurses because of the type of environment they work in. According to a study in 2005, done by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, healthcare workers accounted for 45% of all reported non-fatal assaults resulting in lost work. In 2006, the Massachusetts Nurses Association conducted a similar survey and found that 50% of 172 nurses surveyed have been punched at least once in the past two years.

Even though there are no federal standards requiring workplaces to protect against violence, the Joint Commission—an organization that accredits hospitals—requires hospitals to have a code of conduct to define disruptive behavior as well as manage such behavior.

In the hope of preventing workplace violence, many organizations are installing metal detectors and panic buttons, setting up monitors, adding cameras, and enclosing nurses' stations to minimize the risk of an attack. Nurses are also receiving training on how to verbally diffuse a violent situation. To help nurses feel more comfortable reporting an incident, the Massachusetts Hospital Association suggests using orientation seminars to inform nurses of their rights and reporting avenues.

Source: Human Resource Executive Online



Want to receive articles like this one in your inbox? Subscribe to Nurse Leader Insider!

Most Popular