Long-Term Care

The discharge assessment: Frustration and the future

PPS Alert for Long-Term Care, January 1, 2011

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to PPS Alert for Long-Term Care.

With the birth of the MDS 3.0, SNFs have faced a number of challenges, including the integration and management of multiple process changes. Entire assessment procedures and protocols in facilities across the country have needed to be reconsidered and often redone. Many of the adjustments hinge on the new assessment’s patient-centered approach. In addition, the MDS 3.0 presents new documentation requirements. One of those comes in the form of the discharge assessment.

As outlined in CMS’ 2010 “Train-the-Trainer” conferences, a discharge assessment must be completed by the SNF if a resident is discharged to a private residence (not a leave of absence), for admission to a hospital or other care setting, and in a hospital observation stay for greater than 24 hours.    

There are two types of discharge assessments: return not anticipated (if the resident is not expected to return within 30 days; A0310F = 10) and return anticipated (if the resident is expected back at the SNF within 30 days; A0310F = 11).

Both types are similar to scheduled PPS assessments in terms of required information, so they should not be a major source of confusion—they may, however, be a source of frustration. With much of the information seemingly redundant, dedicating staff time to completing a planned discharge assessment may not be a welcomed choice. 

But it’s important to remember that completing the assessment is a requirement, and it’s one that will likely hold substantial future benefits regarding resident well-being and the transition of care.

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to PPS Alert for Long-Term Care.

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