Long-Term Care

PPS Q&A

PPS Alert for Long-Term Care, May 1, 2010

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to PPS Alert for Long-Term Care.

Q: We are in the process of training our staff on conducting resident interviews under the MDS 3.0. What are some important behaviors we should address when teaching staff about the importance of body language, both their own and the resident’s?

A: When it comes to the MDS 3.0, your interview technique is definitely important, but your attitude and body language are key factors in interviewing success. For example, look at the relationship between certified nursing assistants (CNA) and the nursing staff. A CNA might believe that a nurse doesn’t value his or her input. Although the nurse may deny this, the CNA came to this conclusion by interpreting the nurse’s body language. Attitude and body language are everything. The way you act or react will give off a certain perception. Body language is a public reflection of your attitude and will either confirm your interest or convey insincerity to the interviewee.

When training your staff on the importance of body language, have them take a step back and think about their attitudes. How do they interact with other staff members and residents? What about their body language? Are they smiling but have their arms crossed?
Or are they telling a staff member that they don’t mind if he or she changes hours, but roll their eyes or let out a sigh at the same time? These actions are noticed, and during an interview, these unconscious actions or reactions must be controlled.
 

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to PPS Alert for Long-Term Care.

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