Home

  • Home
    • » e-Newsletters

Q: Should I consider passive range of motion (ROM) and active ROM as two different restorative activities, or do I only count them as one activity?

Julia's PPS Chat, July 21, 2004

Welcome once again to our PPS chat!

How many of you are involved in an exercise program? Probably quite a few of you. When you're exercising, you might follow a certain routine of exercises each day. After each exercise program is complete, you probably feel pretty good about what you have accomplished.

When residents are performing range of motion exercises, you need to be sure that these exercises are recorded correctly. Read on to find out why.

Q: Should I consider passive range of motion (ROM) and active ROM as two different restorative activities, or do I only count them as one activity?

A: Active and passive ROM are different types of joint exercises and you should code them as such in items P3a and P3b of the MDS. Active ROM includes resident participation in the exercises, whereas passive ROM is exercise performed by staff with no assistance from the resident.

You should consider each of these two restorative activities as a separate service when coding the MDS. For Medicare PPS reimbursement purposes, however, you only count these two restorative activities as one restorative service when calculating whether a resident is placed into the low rehabilitation Resource Utilization Group (RUG).

Remember that in order to qualify for a low rehabilitation RUG, the restorative requirement is that you administer two or more nursing rehabilitation services for at least 15 minutes each, with each provided for six or more days.

So, be sure that you are coding these exercises correctly on the MDS. As you now know, PPS reimbursement can be affected greatly by this coding. Also, be sure you do your own exercises today!

We'll be chatting again soon-