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Get a bloody good understanding of GI hemorrhage

Briefings on Coding Compliance Strategies, November 1, 2008

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Gastrointestinal (GI) bleed and its manifestations can be confusing without some insight into definitions and standards. Let’s try to straighten some things out. Is there a GI bleed? What part of the GI tract is it coming from? How severe is it? Is anemia associated with it? What’s causing it? Keep reading for the answers to these and other questions.

The intestinal tract as we usually think of it consists of the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, jejunum and ileum (small intestine), and colon and rectum (large intestine). However, there are other organs that attach to the intestines that may comprise GI bleeds. For example, with a nosebleed or bleeding gums, a patient may demonstrate hematest-positive or guaiac-positive stools (a chemical test that implies blood is present in the stool).

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to Briefings on Coding Compliance Strategies.

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