Credentialing & Privileging

News and briefs: Connecticut malpractice bill faces strong opposition from physicians

Credentialing Resource Center Insider, March 30, 2012

Want to receive articles like this one in your inbox? Subscribe to Credentialing Resource Center Insider!

Physicians are voicing their concern about a bill that would alter Connecticut’s current medical malpractice law. In 2005, a law was enacted that requires people who want to sue healthcare providers to get an opinion from a similar provider before a suit can be filed. According to an article in The Republic, a judge can dismiss a case before it is heard if this expert opinion does not meet the specific requirements. The bill currently before legislators would change “similar” healthcare provider to “qualified” healthcare provider and also give plaintiffs 60 days to fix problems with the opinion the judge finds.

The American Medical Association joined physicians in submitting testimony opposing the new law, saying it would undo something put in place to curb increasing malpractice insurance rates and also allow for more faulty expert opinions.

Supporters of the bill argue it would eliminate costly hurdles that prevent people from having their day in court. “…meritorious cases will not be blocked or delayed by unnecessary and burdensome procedural requirements,” says Kathleen Nastri, a member of the Connecticut Trial Lawyers Association.

To read more, click here.             



Want to receive articles like this one in your inbox? Subscribe to Credentialing Resource Center Insider!

Most Popular