Corporate Compliance

Don’t forget about Medicaid: 2009 OIG Work Plan highlights compliance concerns

Health Care Auditing Strategies, February 1, 2009

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login.

The OIG focuses many of its planned Medicaid audits, reviews, and investigations on state agencies and their program operations. For example, the OIG will review state processes for enrolling Medicaid providers. According to the Work Plan:

States are required to collect information from providers regarding the ownership of healthcare entities and criminal convictions as part of the enrollment process for participating in federal healthcare programs. However, there is no corresponding requirement that states verify the information.

Just because many audits are state-focused doesn’t mean providers can breathe easy when it comes to -Medicaid compliance enforcement from government enforcers. Be aware that many items directed toward state agencies will have an effect on providers, says Sara Kay Wheeler, partner at King & Spalding in Atlanta. In other words, the OIG’s reviews of state agencies will likely result in those states agencies performing more reviews and audits on providers in that state, Wheeler says. “Some, but not all, of these efforts that are focused on states will have a trickle-down effect,” she says.

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login.

Comments

1 comments on “Don’t forget about Medicaid: 2009 OIG Work Plan highlights compliance concerns

Luqman (3/14/2012 at 6:10 PM)
Unfortunately, there is a great distance twbeeen what you believe and what is true. This baseless, roving post provides very little in actual support of an argument that is, on its own, insolvent. To begin, social security and medicare are failed and failing programs. These programs, designed to transfer money from the pockets of one American to another, have been, from the start, poorly managed by the bloated, irresponsible bureaucracy that is Washington. These programs involve governmental coercion of the most insidious kind, as the government justifies its increased involvement in the lives of its citizens through the supposed good intentions of helping America s less fortunate and elderly. Now, in theory, social security, medicare, welfare etc mean well. In practice however, they fail miserably due to problems of organization, size, and range of government. Before these programs, the majority of the elderly were not as you put it, in hopeless poverty . In fact, they were most likely taken care of within their own families, or through [INVALID]nate, non-governmental means. To be fair, you are not alone in buying into the fallacious belief that we should rely on the government to rid us of our social problems, to balance out the spread of wealth, or to even operate efficiently. Just remember, to the first: there is no government, there are people who rule by the consent of the governed. To the second: we live in a nation founded on capitalism. Redistribution is the tool of the communists and fascists. And to the third, most importantly, there is not a single program, in the history of the federal government, that has been run effectively over any considerable time period. Not one.

 

Most Popular