Case Management

The results are in: 2010 case management salary survey

Case Management Monthly, May 1, 2010

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to Case Management Monthly.

Despite the struggling economy, more than half of survey respondents (62%) reported that they had received a raise in the past 12 months—nearly half (49%) indicated the raise range as between 3% and 4%. The results also indicate that the majority of case managers (55%) work more than the traditional 40 hour workweek; 41% work between 31 and 40 hours per week.

“That is good news,” says Karen Zander, RN, MS, CMAC, FAAN, principal and co-owner of The Center for Case Management, Inc., in Wellesley, MA. “I was pleased that employers understand that it’s hard to be a part-time case manager, scheduled now and then,” Zander says.

Nearly 67% of case managers have received at least a bachelor’s degree, which Zander and Daniels say is good news.

A person’s education level says a lot about how they practice case management, Zander says.“Someone with a bachelor’s degree has good clinical thinking, research skills, and self-motivation to seek information for the issues that impact the practice of case management,” she adds.

Interestingly, the highest number of respondents with a bachelor’s degree earns $50,001–$60,000, which is the same for case managers with an associate’s degree. However, case managers with a bachelor’s degree also typically earn salaries in the $60,001–$70,000 and $70,001–$80,000 ranges, whereas those salaries are not as typical for those with associate’s degrees.

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to Case Management Monthly.

Most Popular