Case Management

Ten steps to implementing ED case management

Case Management Monthly, March 1, 2010

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to Case Management Monthly.

The role of ED case manager is expanding, says Karen Zander, RN, MS, CMAC, FAAN. Although the ED is an important entry point for every hospital, it is not the only entry point. Direct admissions, planned admissions, and transfers also contribute to any hospital patient population, and facilities need to properly place those patients.

In smaller hospitals, such as those with fewer than 100 beds, case managers and social workers might be on ED call but have primary responsibilities for other unit assignments.

Unless you are at a large facility, it’s probably not necessary or feasible to have an ED case manager on duty at all times. If there is a period of lower volume, the nurses and physicians must make their best judgments, and case managers working on specific units will need to follow up with ED case management at the start of the next day.

However, if case management is absent from the ED all weekend, case managers will be swamped with reviews on Monday. If a patient is placed in the wrong ­level of care, the case manager will have to work with the physicians, registration, and billing department to reverse the decision.

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to Case Management Monthly.

Most Popular