Accreditation

Joint Commission wants de-escalation training

Briefings on Accreditation and Quality, May 1, 2019

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Workplace violence can bring harm to patients and healthcare workers alike. Assaults can also draw unflattering media attention to your facility and surveyors to your door. The Joint Commission (TJC) released Quick Safety 47: De-escalation in Health Care earlier this year to emphasize the need for training to defuse continuing problems with violence in healthcare.

TJC writes that as violence against nurses, doctors, and healthcare staff becomes even more prevalent, the need for mitigation is greater than ever. Violence and assault are perpetual risks for anyone working in healthcare, particularly nurses and nursing assistants. A three-year study in the American Journal of Nursing noted that 25% of nurses reported being assaulted by patients or family members of patients. Another study found the emergency department, geriatric, and psychiatric settings are the most prone to violent incidents.

This is just the latest push by TJC for hospitals to practice de-escalation as a means to stop workplace violence.

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