Accreditation

Bringing innovation to your facility

Briefings on Accreditation and Quality, December 1, 2017

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to Briefings on Accreditation and Quality.

Fusing a new idea to an old system

Innovation involves doing something differently than how it’s normally done; a new device, policy, or program. And there are plenty of new evidence-based practices, revolutionary studies, and groundbreaking toolkits promising to lift healthcare to new heights.

But of all the innovations you’ve heard about in the past year, how many of them has your facility adopted or made plans to adopt? And of the ones you’ve adopted, how many have worked?

Taking a good idea for your own seems like it ought to be simple. But in reality, many facilities struggle to adopt new innovations—or worse, they give up on ideas they didn’t come up with themselves.

So how do you go about taking someone else’s innovation and incorporating it at your facility? How do you get staff and leadership to buy into a new way of doing things?

Changes take time

Just applying what is already known about healthcare would drive incredible gains in quality and cost savings, says Craig Deao, MHA, senior leader at Studer Group. But despite the abundance of healthcare innovations, not enough of them end up being adopted on a widespread scale.

“I remember reading in the IOM’s 2001 Crossing the Quality Chasm that it takes an average of 17 years for new knowledge generated by randomized controlled trials to be incorporated into practice, and even then application is highly uneven,” Deao says. “And [17 years] is just the median, so there’s still half the market that hasn’t adopted the practice.”

This is an excerpt from a member only article. To read the article in its entirety, please login or subscribe to Briefings on Accreditation and Quality.

Most Popular